Pride and Prejudice Study Guide

Pride and Prejudice

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice follows the lives of the five Bennet sisters and their parents, especially focusing on the second eldest daughter Elizabeth. Though weary of her mother's desperation to place each of her daughters in good marriages, Elizabeth finds herself drawn to Mr. Darcy, a proud and wealthy gentleman who is attracted to Elizabeth because of her intelligence and wit. Amidst the drama of their friends' and families' lives, both must overcome preconceived notions and expectations in this story that explores class, love, and social change.

Chapters Fifty Seven, Fifty Eight, Fifty Nine, Sixty, and Sixty One, Brief Summary

Elizabeth is not sure how Lady Catherine has received her information about Darcy's intention to propose to her and is unsure as to whether or not Lady Catherine will try to stop Darcy from marrying her. Mr. Bennet shows Elizabeth the contents of a letter he has received from Mr. Collins. In the letter, Mr. Collins says that he has heard that Mr. Darcy may propose to Elizabeth.

In chapter fifty eight, Darcy and Mr. Bingley come to Longbourn early in the day. Jane, Bingley, Darcy, Elizabeth, and Kitty take a walk. Jane and Bingley stay behind the rest. As soon as they are alone, Elizabeth expresses her gratitude for Darcy's assistance in Lydia's marriage to Wickham. Darcy tells Elizabeth that his affections for her have not changed. Elizabeth responds that her feelings are much changed.

In chapter fifty nine, Elizabeth convinces her that she is serious and that she loves Darcy. Elizabeth and Darcy decide that Darcy will ask Mr. Bennet's consent in the evening and that Elizabeth will speak to her mother. Mr. Bennet is shocked at Darcy's proposal because he thinks Elizabeth hates Darcy. She assures Mr. Bennet that she holds great affection for Darcy.

In chapters sixty and sixty one, Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy converse playfully about how he fell in love with her and why he took so long to propose the second time. He tells her that his second proposal was all thanks to Lady Catherine, and that her warning had given him hope of Elizabeth's affection.

Mrs. Bennet is happy and proud about her daughters' marriages. Mr. Bennet misses Elizabeth and often goes to visit her at Pemberley. Bingley and Jane leave Netherfield after a year and move to Derbyshire, because their closeness to Mrs. Bennet and the Meryton relations is too much to bear.

Lydia writes to Elizabeth to congratulate her and ask her to see if Mr. Darcy will use his money and influence to help Wickham. Elizabeth replies that she cannot, but does send Lydia money from time to time tat she saves from her private expenses. Georgiana and Elizabeth become very close. Miss Bingley drops her resentment. Relations with Lady Catherine are broken off for a while, but Elizabeth finally convinces Darcy to reconcile with her and Lady Catherine comes to visit them. Darcy and Elizabeth are always on intimate terms with the Gardiners.

Chapters Fifty Seven, Fifty Eight, Fifty Nine, Sixty, and Sixty One, Detailed Summary

After her conversation with Lady Catherine, Elizabeth is very upset. Elizabeth is not sure how Lady Catherine has received her information about Darcy's intention to propose to her. Elizabeth is unsure as to whether or not Lady Catherine will try to stop Darcy from marrying her. Mr. Bennet tells Elizabeth that he wants to speak with shows her the contents of a letter he has received from Mr. Collins. In the letter, Mr. Collins says that he has heard that Mr. Darcy may propose to Elizabeth. Mr. Collins then advises Mr. Bennet to make sure Elizabeth says no to the proposal, as Lady Catherine does not approve of the match. Mr. Bennet thinks the letter is amusing as he has no idea of the growing relationship between his daughter and Mr. Darcy. He, like everyone else, assumes that Elizabeth still hates him.

In chapter fifty eight, Mr. Darcy returns to Netherfield. He and Mr. Bingley come to Longbourn early in the day. Jane, Bingley, Darcy, Elizabeth, and Kitty take a walk. Jane and Bingley stay behind the rest. Eventually Kitty and Mary walk on and Darcy and Elizabeth are left alone together. As soon as they are alone, Elizabeth expresses her gratitude for Darcy's assistance in Lydia's marriage to Wickham. Darcy replies that he had hoped she would not find out, but adds that it was not done for her family's sake, but for hers. Elizabeth can think of nothing to say.

Darcy tells Elizabeth that his affections for her are no different than they were when he proposed. Darcy asks Elizabeth to tell him if her feelings have stayed the same. Elizabeth responds that she is afraid to think of what her feelings were, but that were feelings have definitely changed and assures him that there is a great affection for him on her part. Darcy is overjoyed at hearing this and speaks openly of his love for Elizabeth. Darcy relates that Elizabeth's refusal to tell Lady Catherine that she would not marry Darcy had given him hope.

Elizabeth and Darcy talk of the first proposal; both apologize for the way they acted. Darcy relates that since the last proposal he had been tortured by Elizabeth statement that he should have acted in a more gentleman-like manner." Elizabeth tells Darcy that his letter removed all her former prejudices. Darcy tells Elizabeth that before leaving for London he told Bingley about his interference with his marriage to Jane, and that he was wrong to have done so.

In chapter fifty nine, when Elizabeth is finally able to speak with Jane alone, she tells her what has happened and about the conversation she has had with Mr. Darcy. Jane cannot believe it, but eventually Elizabeth convinces her that she is serious and that she loves Darcy. The next morning, Mrs. Bennet is annoyed at seeing Mr. Darcy has again accompanied Bingley to Longbourn. She suggests that Elizabeth take him for a walk so that Jane and Bingley can be alone. Elizabeth is happy to do so. Elizabeth and Darcy decide that Darcy will ask Mr. Bennet's consent in the evening and that Elizabeth will speak to her mother.

Mr. Bennet is shocked at Darcy's proposal because he thinks Elizabeth hates Darcy. She assures Mr. Bennet that she holds great affection for Darcy. That night Elizabeth tells her mother of the engagement. Her mother is happy in thinking of how rich Darcy is; her former dislike of him is completely forgotten.

In chapters sixty and sixty one, Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy converse playfully about how he fell in love with her and why he took so long to propose the second time. He tells her that his second proposal was all thanks to Lady Catherine, and that her warning had given him hope of Elizabeth's affection. Miss Bingley's reactions to the engagement of Bingley and Jane are affectionate but insincere. Miss Darcy's reaction to Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth's engagement is one of delight.

The Collins' come to stay at Lucas Lodge because Lady Catherine is so angry at the engagement. Mrs. Bennet is happy and proud about her daughters' marriages. Mr. Bennet misses Elizabeth and often goes to visit her at Pemberley. Bingley and Jane leave Netherfield after a year and move to Derbyshire, because their closeness to Mrs. Bennet and the Meryton relations is too much to bear.

Kitty now spends most of her time with her sisters, and is much improved by their example and society. Mary stays at home and keeps her mother company on her visits. Lydia writes to Elizabeth to congratulate her and ask her to see if Mr. Darcy will use his money and influence to help Wickham. Elizabeth replies that she cannot, but does send Lydia money from time to time tat she saves from her private expenses.

Miss Bingley drops her resentment of Darcy's marriage because she wants to retain the right of visiting Pemberley. Georgiana and Elizabeth become very close and very fond of one another. Relations with Lady Catherine are broken off for a while, but Elizabeth finally convinces Darcy to reconcile with her and Lady Catherine comes to visit them. Darcy and Elizabeth are always on intimate terms with the Gardiners.

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